Toronto Screenwriting Awards

The Toronto Screenwriting Awards is a celebration honouring the very best in screenwriting excellence. Spanning twelve diverse categories, we aim to recognize and award writers of produced screenplays across a multitude of genres and formats. Here at the TSA’s we believe that in the golden age of film and television many writers have been left unrecognized. As such, our tailored categories aim to award writers in often overlooked formats giving them the recognition they deserve. With a rigorous judging process culminating in juries of experienced industry professionals, the TSA’s strive to be the gold standard in screenwriting awards.

Awards Submission

Deadline to submit is Monday, April 30 at midnight EST.

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Rules & Eligibility


Scripts must be in PDF format.


Scripts must have a title page with title of the script only (no contact information).


Television submissions must include a title page with the name of the series and episode only.


No contact information or name of author in the body of the script.


Submission fee of $95 CAD must be received.


Film submissions may only be submitted by the writer.


TV submissions may only be submitted by the showrunner.


A maximum of three script submissions per series.


Films and episodic content may originate or have aired anywhere in the world as long as the script was originally written in English. No translations.


Films must have been theatrically released, screened at a film festival, or premiered on premium SVOD such as Amazon Prime, HBO, Netflix, Showtime, or Starz between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017.


TV episodes must have broadcast on network, cable, premium SVOD such as Amazon Prime, HBO, Netflix, Showtime, or Starz between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017.

Category Descriptions

FEATURE FILM

 


DRAMA
Feature length drama screenplay candidates are predominantly serious. In this category the exposition, rising action, climax and falling action are written for dramatic impact. The characters, descriptions and tone should also reflect dramatic qualities. While candidates in this category can have comedic moments, characters or scenes, comedy should not be the primary intention of the screenplay.


COMEDY
Feature length comedy screenplay candidates are predominantly funny. In this category the exposition, rising action, climax and falling action are written for comedic impact. The characters, descriptions and tone should also reflect comedic qualities. While candidates in this category can have dramatic moments, characters or scenes drama should not be the primary intention of the screenplay.


GENRE
Feature length genre screenplay candidates are written with science fiction, fantasy, horror, or supernatural elements. This category will take into consideration heightened realties, new universes, and scenarios beyond the expectations of our everyday world. While these screenplays can have heavy dramatic or comedic elements the stories will primarily include, but not be limited to: monsters, imagined futures, space travel, superheroes, fantasy worlds, and the paranormal.


ANIMATION
Feature length screenplays that incorporate the medium of animation. Styles include, but are not limited to, 3D animation, hand drawn, and stop motion. All animation screenplays will be accepted regardless of its target audience (ie. children or adults).

TELEVISION – DRAMA

 


SERIALIZED
Dramatic teleplay wherein the main storyline or character arcs span multiple episodes or seasons. Serialized series may have episodic elements in some arcs however the main fundamentals of any specific episode or the series do not promise an ending to the main series arcs or main series characters until the series produces its final episode.


PROCEDURAL
Dramatic teleplay wherein the primary narrative wraps up by the end of the episode. These generally include, but are not limited to, case of the week/detective, crime/law, or medical shows. Although procedurals may have some serialized elements the main focus of each episode should be closed in nature.


GENRE
Genre teleplay candidates are written with science fiction, fantasy, horror, or supernatural elements. This category will take into consideration heightened realties, new universes, and scenarios beyond the expectations of our everyday world. While these screenplays can have heavy dramatic or comedic elements the stories will primarily include, but not be limited to, monsters, imagined futures, space travel, superheroes, fantasy worlds, imagined futures, and the paranormal.


FAMILY
Family dramatic teleplays utilize rising action, climax and falling action are written for dramatic impact that is appropriate for kids under twelve or family co-viewing. The characters, descriptions and tone should also reflect dramatic qualities. While candidates in this category can have comedic moments, characters or scenes, comedy should not be the primary intention of the teleplay.

TELEVISION – COMEDY

 


SINGLE CAMERA
Single camera comedy teleplays are primarily humourous in narrative, dialogue, character, tone and must incorporate the single camera modality of production.


MULTI CAMERA
Multi camera comedy teleplays are primarily humourous in narrative, dialogue, character, tone and must incorporate the multi camera modality of production.


YOUTH & FAMILY
Youth and Family comedy teleplays utilize rising action, climax and falling action are written for comedic impact that is appropriate for kids under twelve or family co-viewing. The characters, descriptions and tone should also reflect comedic qualities. While candidates in this category can be single cam, multi cam or animated the intention of appealing to youth and family audiences through moments, characters or scenes should be the primary intention of the teleplay.


ANIMATION
Comedy screenplays that incorporate the medium of animation. Styles include, but are not limited to, 3D animation, hand drawn, and stop motion. All animation screenplays will be accepted regardless of its target audience.

FAQs

How long are submissions open?

In 2018, submissions will be open from March 19 to April 30. Make sure to get your scripts in on time as there are no extended deadlines.

How do I enter?

Submissions are done entirely online, please use the submission form at the bottom of this page.

I have a screenplay that wasn’t produced. Can I still submit?

Unfortunately, no. The TSA’s are for produced screenplays only.

How many scripts can I submit?

Maximum of three scripts submissions per show and only one writer submission per show.

Is there any entry script page length maximum or minimum?

No.

I co-wrote a script, can I enter?

Co-writes are acceptable.

What if my script fits more than one category (ie. is both genre and drama?)

Entrants may choose whichever category they deem the best fit for their script.

Who can submit?

For television, the showrunner or appropriate assistant may submit on their behalf a maximum of three episodes per series. For film, the writer of the screenplay or appropriate assistant may submit on their behalf a maximum of three scripts per year.

Are citizens other than the United States and Canada allowed to enter?

Yes, as long as the original script was written in English anyone may submit.

Can a showrunner submit themselves?

Yes, but only once per series.

Can I submit more than one script if I wrote on more than one show.

Yes, for example if you wrote on Orange is the New Black and Bojack Horseman you can submit an Orange is the New Black script and a Bojack script.

What does the cost of entry cover?

Paying our readers, administration costs, the awards, printing, network and database expenses, and general upkeep.

When will we be notified?

Nominees will be announced in late May with winners being announced at the 2018 Toronto Screenwriting Conference June 23 & 24.

How are winners chosen?

Scripts are put through a rigorous judging process consisting of multiple rounds of reading from industry professionals. Nominated scripts move on to our final jury round where they will be read and discussed by top industry professionals specializing in their respective categories.

My script is not in English, but aired in North America. May I still enter?

The script must originally have been written in English. No translations.

Why do I need a logline and synopsis? Are they used in the judging?

Loglines and synopsis are not used in the judging process. They are used to help staff distinguish scripts from one another. For example, if multiple episodes of Modern Family are submitted the loglines and synopsis can help set them apart from one another.

What happens to my script if it is not chosen?

Unchosen scripts will be deleted from our servers.

How does the judging process work?

Scripts are assigned to industry readers through several rounds of judging until a group of nominees for each category is chosen. Nominated scripts move on to our jury round where scripts will be discussed by top industry professionals in their chosen field. For example, animated scripts will be judged and reviewed by professionals who know, understand, and have vast experience in that particular field.

Who are the first round readers?

First round readers are individuals involved in the industry. They can be writers, development execs, producers, with a strong knowledge of screenplay story structure.

Questions?

Email awards@torontoscreenwritingconference.com if you have any further questions about the submissions or eligibility requirements.

Toronto Screenwriting Awards Submission Form

STEP 1: Complete Entry Details & Upload Script

Before uploading your script, please make sure you include the following in your PDF file:

 

  1. A cover sheet with only the TITLE of the screenplay
  2. A second title page with contact information is not required for online submissions
  3. The author’s name must not appear anywhere in the script in order to preserve anonymity in the judging process


STEP 2: Submission Payment

Price Qty*
Toronto Screenwriting Awards Submission show details + $95.00 (CAD)  

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